The global impact of farming

Land farming isn’t as environmentally sustainable as is used to be; the needs are too high, and space is limited. To keep up demand, production in the land farms would have to generate 80 kg of fish per cubic meter. This process uses up too much water and puts more pressure on freshwater sources.

  • By 2025, 1.8 billion people will live in areas with water scarcity
  • the amount of energy needed to meet growing demands could power a city of 1.2 million people

Heavy Footprint

Heavy Footprint

2 billion kg of land-based farms produce 526 billion kg of greenhouse gas emissions

20%

20%

Agriculture water usage will increase 20 percent by 2050

Diminishing Returns

Diminishing Returns

Wild stocks drastically diminished due to population growth in Puget Sound area

Unhealthy Fish

Unhealthy Fish

Overfilled land farms lower quality of life for fish

What’s good for the environment is good for us all

Farmed salmon is a low-barrier protein that people of any income level can enjoy. It’s full of omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin A, B12, and D, as well as an excellent source of iron and zinc. It’s also low in fat and calories, making it one of the most well-rounded proteins out there.

To ensure a quality product, many farmers partner with local environmental research groups and science-driven organizations to evaluate and audit their farming practices.

  • Atlantic salmon can be traced back to their original farms, with records of their eating habits
  • Fish feed production generates three times fewer greenhouse gases than pig feed and six times less than cattle
  • the US spent 2.5 billion dollars on imported salmon in 2015 – farming salmon locally would significantly reduce our carbon footprint

 

How aquaculture eases strain

Fish farming in the ocean consumes less freshwater and allows the salmon to grow without crowding. They only occupy four percent of their net pens, allowing for a higher quality product. Ocean farms also use certified, disease-free smolts, which are never genetically modified as part of a commitment the International Salmon Farmers’ Association made in 1996. The feeds are free of both growth hormones, which are prohibited by the FDA, and artificial dyes. The salmon get their color from the same antioxidants they would find in nature.

This system is better for the environment, and in turn, provides us with better tasting seafood.

  • Farmed salmon requires a fraction of the freshwater needed to raise cattle, or grow rice
  • Aquaculture provides the planet with fresh seafood year-round
  • Releases pressure from wild stock and prevents overfishing

6X Less

6X Less

fish feed is three times fewer emissions than pigs and six times less than cattle

4%

4%

Fish only occupy 4 percent of their net pens

Clean Fish

Clean Fish

Our salmon are not genetically modified and we do not use growth hormones.

2.5 Billion

2.5 Billion

2.5 billion dollars spent on imports, local sources would significantly reduce this impact